“Black Lives Matter” Banner Recap

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This past Saturday, MLUC held a dedication service for its “Black Lives Matter” banner. The banner was placed in front of the church at the intersection of South Valley Forge Road and Maplewood Avenue in Devon. Several hundred congregants, as well as visitors and friends were in attendance.

Featured speakers included Andrea Durham, an attorney and member of the Unitarian Society of Germantown, which also has a “Black Lives Matter” banner; Rev. Tom Beers of Central Baptist Church in Wayne, the first church in the surrounding community to display a “Black Lives Matter” banner; and attorney Anita Friday, who was featured in the cover story of the November edition of the Philadelphia Magazine, “Racial Profiling on the Main Line.”

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Reverend Neal Jones said, “The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,000, compared with $110,000 for the average white household. Whites in America on average own 18 times as much wealth as blacks. Black men earn 71 cents for every dollar on average white men earn doing the same job; black women earn 64 cents. The United States now has a greater wealth gap by race than South Africa did during apartheid. We need to say that Black Lives Matter.”

“From the beginning and throughout this movement, it has advocated for nonviolent change to an unjust system. Some try to misrepresent the Black Lives Matter movement as being anti-police. It is not anti-police; it is anti-police brutality. The Black Lives Matter movement wants what every good cop, every good police chief, and every good citizen wants: police officers who will protect and serve all people equally.”

“MLUC is displaying this banner because it wants every person who passes by the church to see that this is a counter-cultural church, that unlike so much of American society, MLUC believes that black lives matter. The banner also displays the first Unitarian Universalist principle: to uphold the inherent worth and dignity of every person.”

Listen to a recording of the event.